Our network includes BCBS PPO,UHC PPO, and AETNA PPO

(630) 537-0758

230 E Ogden Ave b, Hinsdale, IL 60521, USA

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Quality Care

Functional Medicine

Functional Medicine determines how and why illness occurs and restores health by addressing the root causes of disease for each individual.

The Functional Medicine model is an individualized, patient-centered, science-based approach that empowers patients and practitioners to work together to address the underlying causes of disease and promote optimal wellness. It requires a detailed understanding of each patient’s genetic, biochemical, and lifestyle factors and leverages that data to direct personalized treatment plans that lead to improved patient outcomes.

By addressing root cause, rather than symptoms, practitioners become oriented to identifying the complexity of disease. They may find one condition has many different causes and, likewise, one cause may result in many different conditions. As a result, Functional Medicine treatment targets the specific manifestations of disease in each individual.

In addition to routine laboratory testing, we offer advanced analysis in AutoImmunity screening:


Intestinal Antigenic Permeability Screen

Wheat/Gluten Proteome Reactivity & Autoimmunity

Gluten-Associated Cross-Reactive Foods and Foods Sensitivity

Multiple Autoimmune Reactivity Screen

Diabetes Autoimmune Reactivity Screen

Neurological Autoimmune Reactivity Screen

Neurological Autoimmune Reactivity Screen - Expanded

Multiple Food Immune Reactivity Screen

Chemical Immune Reactivity Screen

Pathogen-Associated Immune Reactivity Screen

Mucosal Immune Reactivity Screen

Blood Brain Barrier Permeability *

Irritable Bowel/SIBO Screen

Total Secretory IgA






Duration of gluten exposure is key factor in developing other autoimmune diseases

The longer sensitive individuals eat gluten, the more likely they are to develop other autoimmune diseases


A 1999 landmark study published in Gastroenterology found that the duration of exposure to gluten in celiac disease patients affects the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. The finding made age at diagnosis an important factor in the overall health of patients with celiac disease.


For the study, an Italian research team screened 909 patients with celiac disease for other autoimmune diseases, including IDDM (Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus), DH (Dermatitis herpetiformis), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis or Graves’ disease, autoimmune hepatitis, alopecia, atrophic autoimmune gastritis, connective tissue disease (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, or Sjogren’s disease), psoriasis, Addison’s disease, unexplained cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy with cerebral calcification, or immune anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. They then compared the prevalence of these conditions in three different subgroups, which were separated based on when the patient was diagnosed with celiac disease (before age 2, between ages 2 and 10, and after age 10).


The team found that the prevalence of the other conditions was highest in the subgroup of patients diagnosed after age 10. Similarly, patients diagnosed between ages 2 and 10 had a higher rate of other conditions than those diagnosed before age 2. This suggests that the prevalence of autoimmune conditions increases with increasing age at diagnosis of celiac disease (ie, increasing duration of exposure to gluten).


The researchers’ chart below demonstrates the frequency of developing other autoimmune diseases.


The authors concluded: “Indeed, the age at diagnosis of celiac disease is the single best predictor of the prevalence of autoimmune disease.”


Ventura A, Magazzú G, Greco L; SIGEP Study Group for Autoimmune Disorders in Celiac Disease. Duration of exposure to gluten and risk for autoimmune disorders in patients with celiac disease. Gastroenterology. 1999;117:297–303.